Procedure: Brevity, Clarity and Confirmation - Communication - United Task Force (UNITAF) Arma 3


P10-160 Procedure: Brevity, Clarity and Confirmation

UNITAF / Arma 3 / Communication Procedures



Version 1 / 6min read / Updated Sat 21 Aug 2021 / 158 views


In this section we'll outline a number of examples that address Brevity, Clarity and Confirmation.

Brevity by avoidance of doubling callsigns

This example shows how to improve Brevity by avoiding the callsigns on transmissions between two parties AFTER the identification has been completed.

Here we are having the callsigns Outlaw and Phoenix.

 

Bad Brevity:

Here, Outlaw and Phoenix will Warn the receiver and Identify themselves before each transmission even though it is clear that the conversation is only carried out between these two as no other Callsigns are Warned.
 

Outlaw: Phoenix, this is Outlaw.

Phoenix: Outlaw, this is Phoenix.

Outlaw: Phoenix, this is Outlaw, READ BACK, move South 300 m and establish a hasty defensive position.

Phoenix: Outlaw, this is Phoenix, I READ BACK, move South 300 m and establish a hasty defensive position.

Outlaw: Phoenix, this is Outlaw, CORRECT, OUT.

Phoenix: Outlaw, this is Phoenix, from what direction are we expecting contacts at that location?

Outlaw: Phoenix, this is Outlaw, contact is to be expected from the South-West.

Phoenix: Outlaw, this is Phoenix, ROGER, OUT.

 

Better Brevity:

Here, Outlaw and Phoenix will Warn the receiver and Identify themselves only until the identifications have been completed. Afterwards they omit this to keep the messages significantly shorter. This is possible because as they are not establishing communications with another party, it is implied that all transmissions are between these two.
 

Outlaw: Phoenix, this is Outlaw.

Phoenix: Outlaw, this is Phoenix.

Outlaw: READ BACK, move South 300 m and establish a hasty defensive position.

Phoenix: I READ BACK, move South 300 m and establish a hasty defensive position.

Outlaw: CORRECT, OUT.

Phoenix: From what direction are we expecting contacts at that location?

Outlaw: Contact is to be expected from the South-West.

Phoenix: ROGER, OUT.

 

Clarity by avoidance of multiple Warning Orders

This example shows the importance of properly Alerting and Identifying and subsequently how to improve clarity by avoiding multiple warning orders when transmitting. This is crucial as oftentimes callsigns will ignore any incoming transmissions as soon as they don’t hear their call sign at the very beginning of the Warning Order. Further, it avoids confusion as to who is the calling station and who is the receiving station.

Here we are having the callsigns Alpha 1-0, 1-1 and 1-2 on a Squad net.
They are using the shortened callsigns 1-0 or Actual, 1-1 or 1, and 1-2 or 2.

 

Bad Clarity:

Here, 1-0 wants to pass an order to both his fireteams, 1-1 and 1-2. However, 1-0 forgets to properly establish communications and identify himself, creating a widely ambiguous message.

 

1 transmits:

1, 2.

 

What 1 means is:

1, and 2, this is Actual.

 

However his transmission could be understood as:

1-1, this is 1-2.

 

Meaning 1 will assume that 2 wants to talk to him.

Furthermore, 2 might just ignore this transmission and not answer Actual, even if it was transmitted as intended, because he didn’t hear his own callsign at the beginning of the transmission.

 

Better Clarity:

Here, 1 will properly identify himself to ensure everything is understood as intended. To ensure that 1-2 is listening as well he also avoids using multiple warning orders back to back through the clever use of ALL STATIONS as only 1-1 and 1-2 are on the net with him.
 

1-0: ALL STATIONS, this is Actual.

1-1: Actual, this is 1.

1-2: Actual, this is 2.


Though keep in mind that if you want to be sure the call signs are listening to a long message, ask yourself, does the whole message concern all call signs? If not, break it up, address the call signs one by one with their relevant traffic.

And if there would be another callsign, 1-3, on his net, the best alternative would be to call 1-1 and 1-2 individually, in seperate transactions.

 

The importance of confirmation

This example shows how to improve information flow with confirmations. Here we are having the callsigns Outlaw and Phoenix.

 

No Confirmation:

Here, Outlaw passes an attack order to Phoenix who starts his attack as intended but is not confirming that he has received the order. Because of this, Outlaw doesn’t start his part of the attack yet, leading to Phoenix receiving heavy losses due to being outnumbered as a result of the missing support.

 

Outlaw: Phoenix, this is Outlaw.

Phoenix: Outlaw, this is Phoenix.

Outlaw: Start your Attack onto Objective Bravo.

(Phoenix does not answer, even though Outlaw didn’t use OUT. Hence, Outlaw tries to establish communications again)

Outlaw: Phoenix, this is Outlaw, NOTHING HEARD.

Phoenix: Outlaw, this is Phoenix, we are on Objective Bravo, where is your support?!

Outlaw: ROGER, commencing attack now, OUT.

 

Confirmation used:

Here, Outlaw passes an attack order to Phoenix who confirms that he has received the order, will carry it out and subsequently starts his attack as intended. Because of this Outlaw can start his part of the attack as well, leading to a swift victory due to the mutual support.

 

Outlaw: Phoenix, this is Outlaw.

Phoenix: Outlaw, this is Phoenix.

Outlaw: Start your Attack onto Objective Bravo.

Phoenix: WILCO, OUT.



REFERENCES
UNITAF Standard Operating procedures (SOP)
are adapted primarly from US Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC). Our written and audio procedures are a combination of the following primary source materials, as well as our own learnings, modifications and adaptations:
- US Army Techniques Publication, Infantry Platoon and Squad (ATP 3-21.8)
- Soldier’s Manual of Common Tasks Warrior Leader Skills Level 2, 3, and 4 (STP 21-24-SMCT)
- The Warrior Ethos and Soldier Combat Skills (FM 3-21.75 / FM 21-75)
- Leadership Development (FM 6-22)
- Dyslexi's Tactics, Techniques, & Procedures for Arma 3 (TTP3)




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